Sasquatch Speaks – A Review

Still from Sasquatch Speaks Documentary, used for review purposes.

This film is disturbing to watch, and I think that is due to the sheer level of delusion presented. Look, believe what you want, we all have zany ideas, but this kind of stuff typically doesn’t survive an elementary education. To see grown people sitting around talking about telepathic communication with Bigfoot, the healing powers of Sasquatch, and higher love frequencies being the secret to connecting with the “forest people”, as if they have been bestowed with some special arcane knowledge that supersedes any academic or scientific knowledge simply weirds me out. It’s creepy.

I haven’t been so unsettled watching a Bigfoot documentary since Not Your Typical Bigfoot Movie when some guy posited the theory of Bigfoot levitating to avoid leaving footprints. The rest of that documentary, though strange, had a human element that at least made some kind of an impact; you felt some empathy for the two main guys. Sasquatch Speaks contains no redeeming qualities. It is more a documentation of delusional belief, psychosis, and who shouldn’t do shrooms, than it is a documentary about Sasquatch. And there are two more in the series!

Sasquatch Speaks brings us interviews with such memorable, self-appointed shamans, healers and elders as Kewaunee Lapseritis, “Reverend” White Otter (or did she say Reverend Dwight Otter?), Otter’s spouse Su Walker, Sunbow TrueBrother and others. These folks sit there and tell us about Sasquatch being interdimensional and at times see-through, with the ability to heal and comfort people. Sounds like Jesus.

Spiritual and religious beliefs tend to get blended with all of this paranormal and cryptozoological stuff. UFOs and space aliens take the place of guardian angels; mysterious, elusive monsters in the woods become ancient wisemen who can pass between dimensions. For some reason these hairy creatures who stink like skunks and armpits are higher level spiritual beings. So much for the splendid Nordic aliens replete in their flowing robes and blond hair.

Weird gets weirder. Or maybe the weird stays the same. It just gets recycled decade after decade, fastening itself to whatever it can to help people feel connected to something bigger than they are. It fulfills a need. A need to belong, a longing for purpose, and a need to understand.

It’s still weird though. There is this thing called science, and bash it as spiritualists may, it works on facts and evidence. To pretend there is some supernatural or spiritual realm one could fathom that knowledgable scientists can’t, is delusional. Some say you can’t approach religion through science because they can not be reconciled, but in reality the only way to approach religion is through science because then we come to the truth. You can’t know something you can’t know, period.

This film, and I use the term loosely, is disturbing. It’s also poorly produced. The cartoon intro sets the stage perfectly: it’s a childish endeavor. I do not want to see another movie like this ever again, so will not be viewing the subsequent parts.

Comments are closed.